“I’m Okay, I’m Fine.” How To Identify Suppressed Emotions

We’ve all experienced situations where we’ve wanted to speak up or where we’ve wanted to get one pressing issue off our chest. We’ve all been on the verge of crying or cursing from pent up frustration and anger. We’ve all held those outbursts and emotions in check so long that it shows in the tenseness of our faces or the weariness of our demeanor to the point that others begin to ask, “What’s wrong? Are you okay?” Too often we respond with a less than honest, “I’m okay” or “I’m fine” – anything but the truthful answer.

Suppressing your emotions in such situations often leads to feelings of stress and increased levels of anxiety. It can also have harmful physical manifestations.

I’d like to share with you some of the dangers in suppressing your emotions. My professional desire is that you will develop healthy ways to express your feelings and emotions in appropriate fashions and at appropriate times. Here’s why that’s so important.

Suppressed Emotions Are Linked To Resentment

Many people acknowledge that repressed anger can cause feelings of resentment. The truth, though, is that suppressing any emotion leads to resentment. That inner resentment often manifests itself as the belief that our needs are not being met. Outer resentment often manifests itself as the notion that not enough is being done to meet our needs. That resentment can be deepened when we believe those actions are intentional.

Suppressed Emotions Are Linked To Heart Disease

Healthy emotions are born in part by the beneficial release of those emotions. The emotional responses of the heart involve acknowledging the reality of the situations and circumstances in which you find yourself, and further involve dealing with those emotions both inwardly and outwardly. Burying your feelings may seem like a good idea in the heat of the moment, but that suppression can lead to those emotions bursting onto the surface at inappropriate times.

Suppressed Emotions Are Linked To High Levels of Anxiety in the Body

Suppressed emotions can be among the contributing causes of anxiety, stress, stroke, and heart disease. The health risks of suppressed emotions increase when there is no safe environment to express those emotions. Stress build-up can manifest itself as inner conflict and turmoil that can make it impossible to live a happy life.

Too many people shy away from negative emotions not realizing that there is a world of difference between being silent when it’s appropriate and using wise words to express your emotions. Pent-up emotions can be as detrimental to your physical health as they are to your mental wellbeing. After all, what do you have to lose in respectfully expressing your feelings and/or emotions?

Hopefully, by respectfully expressing yourself in healthy ways, by finding outlets for emotions you might otherwise suppress, and by releasing the feelings and people who lead to tense and traumatic situations, you’re lessening the possibility of leading an unfulfilling life. Learning to avoid oncoming stress triggers, lose existing stress, and purposely free yourself from an unhappy disposition, you’ll find yourself physically healthy and in a better position to embark on the road to a healthy, happy, meaningful life.